SEVENS FROM SOWER’S PARABLES NUMBERS

Just very simple math

SUMMARY

At least seven number sets from both the New Testament and Hebrew Bible, when manipulated with Sower’s parables numbers (30-60-100 or 100-60-30), yield an unexpected “seventy times seven” or other result with multiple sevens, a special number in the Bible, suggesting a shared numerical foundation for those passages.  A popular idea is that the books of the Gospel were written independently.  However, three of the seven-solutions are gained by combining various books.  Maybe the Sower’s-derived sevens are just a coincidence, but the odds are overwhelmingly against it.  Are they instead a lucky charm, a secret code, or a lesson in awareness??  I don’t know.  If you find other Sower’s-derived sevens in the Bible, please let me know.

OUTLINE

The same factor (24 x 5 x 72) can be derived from both the Ezekiel temple measurements and the numerical values of the Greek first-letters of apostles’ names and appellations (combining Mark and Luke).

(For those who cannot view exponentials, the factor is 2 to the fourth power times 5 times seven-squared.)

First I manipulate the number sets with the numbers found in the Sower’s parables:  100, 60 30.  (Sower’s verses one click)  Then I discover (surprise!) that the resultant sums are evenly divisible by “seventy times seven,” found in Matthew 18:22 (footnote NRSV). -18:22-

A bonus:  the apostles’ values produce a sum for every integer up through the set total – like magic!

In Ezra chapter 2, application of Sower’s numbers results in a factor of “seventy times seven.”  All three parts, Ezra, Ezekiel, and apostles, have in common the Sower’s-derived factor 40 x 7 x 7, special numbers in the Bible.

In Revelation chapters 11-13, application of Sower’s numbers results in a factor of seven-cubed.

Among the combined six loaves and fishes stories, Sower’s numbers reveal “seventy times seven.”

In 1 Esdras, Sower’s numbers yield 70 x 7, or seven-squared and 2 to the seventh power.

Sower’s numbers reveal a “seventy times seven” in 1 Corinthians.

Revelation’s cube-city gemstones in chapter 21, yield a “seventy times seven” plus other factors that are special numbers such as “144” (12 x 12) and a variant form of the number of a beast (616).

HOW TO USE THE SOWER’S PARABLES NUMBERS

The method common to the various parts of the Bible is this:

(1) Divide a discrete number set into three equal parts;

(2) Multiply by the first part by 100, the second part by 60, the third part by 30;

(3) Sum the products;

(4) Divide by 7, then by 70, (does it divide evenly?), and repeat with the reverse 30-60-100;

If that doesn’t work, improvise.  If the biblical authors intended to make puzzles, then each solution might be expected to vary slightly from another, otherwise it would be too easy.

EZEKIEL

Here are 81 values taken from Ezekiel temple measurements, chapters 40 through 43 (NRSV), in cubits, arranged in three sets of 27, in the order in which they appear:

Set 1

5, 1, 8, 2, 10, 13, 1, 6, 25, 20, 50, 50, 25, 100, 50, 25, 100, 50, 25, 25, 5, 50, 25, 50, 25, 1, 1,

Sum = 748

Set 2

100, 100, 5, 14, 3, 20, 12, 6, 10, 5, 40, 20, 2, 6, 7, 20, 20, 6, 4, 5, 20, 5, 70, 5, 90, 100, 100,

Sum = 795

Set 3

100, 100, 3, 2, 50, 20, 10, 100, 50, 50, 100, 500, 500, 500, 500, 500, 500, 1, 1, 2, 1, 4, 1, 4, 12, 14, 1,

Sum = 3626

Notes on how to select the cubits values:

Use only cubits that are measures, not “a cubit,” not “the cubit.”  Half is not counted as a number.  “Long cubit” is not counted as a cubit.  “14 cubits and 14” counts as only one cubits measure, “14 cubits,” and so on.  Heed warning in Revelation 11:2 about the outer court and do not use the value of 100 that follows “outer court” in Ezekiel 40:17; and do not use the value of 100 that follows “outer court” in Ezekiel 42:1.  Do not use the value 2 that the NRSV says is in the Greek but not in the Hebrew.  Of course I can only guess how to build a group of 81 values and such may not have been intended by the biblical author.

Using the “100, 60, 30” in the Sower’s Parables ((1)  Matthew 13:8 – 100, 60, 30; (2)  Matthew 13:23 – 100, 60, 30; (3)  Mark 4:8 – 30, 60, 100; (4)  Mark 4:20 – 30, 60, 100; (5)  Luke 8:8 – 100):

100 x sum 1 = 100 x 748 = 74,800

60 x sum 2 = 60 x 795 = 47,700

30 x sum 3 = 30 x 3626 = 108,780

Sum of products = 231,280

231,280 = 59 x (24 x 5 x 72)

APOSTLES

Here are the 27 values of Greek first-letters of apostle names and appellations taken from Mark AND Luke and the numerical values of these characters (background below):

8 of Ἰ (each 10), 4 of Ἁ (each 1), 3 of Σ (each 200), 2 of Θ (each 9), 2 of Ζ (each 7), 2 of Β (each 2), 1 of Μ (40), 1 of Υ (400), 1 of Κ (20), 1 of Φ (500), 1 of Π (80), 1 of Τ (300),

Here are the 27 apostles’ values arranged in order of ascent, in three subsets of 9 values each:

Subset 1

1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 7, 7, 9,

Sum = 31

Subset 2

9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10,

Sum = 89

Subset 3

20, 40, 80, 200, 200, 200, 300, 400, 500,

Sum = 1940

Using the Sower’s parable numbers (100, 60, 30) do the following calculation:

100 x sum 1 = 100 x 31 = 3,100

60 x sum 2 = 60 x 89 = 5,340

30 x sum 3 = 30 x 1940 = 58,200

Sum of products = 66,640

66,640 = 17 x (24 x 5 x 72)

ODDS AGAINST A SHARED FACTOR

Now I am not suddenly going to become an expert on probability but please bear with me.

We can readily see that the value 24 x 5 x 72 = 3920, will occur only once in every 3920 integers in sequence.  The probability of this happening in both Ezekiel and with the apostles (twice), is 1 in 3920 multiplied by 1 in 3920 or 1 in 15,366,400.  Odds against are better than 1 in 15 million!

Does this prove that the biblical author must have deliberately constructed the apostles’ names and appellations (last names, nicknames, etc.) to achieve a certain result with the numerical values of the Greek first-letters?  It doesn’t prove anything to me because I know that on any given day, somebody somewhere may have won the lottery against all odds.  Coincidences can happen.  But I admit the numbers are intriguing.

I think it is a valid question to ask if the New Testament author(s) copied a numerical structure from the Hebrew Bible in order to construct apostles’ names and appellations.  After all, much was borrowed, even explicitly, as when it says, “according to the scriptures.”  It is a question which presupposes that I have correctly assembled the sets of numerical values in each case – a huge assumption – because the sets are just a careful guess.  It is a question that has no answer because we do not have the privilege of consulting with the biblical author(s) to ask what he or she or they intended.

BONUS APOSTLES’ FEATURE

The 27 numbers in the apostles’ set add up to 2060.  I believe the real magic is that any number, 1 through 2060, may be generated by taking/adding one or more of the numbers in the set, using each of the 27 set numbers not more than once.  Why is this remarkable?  Because there are only 12 types of characters in the set out of a possible total of 24 Greek letter-characters used for numerals.  Isn’t it a nice feature that the numerical values of the first-letters of apostle names and appellations allow these sums to be generated?

Having every value up through 2060 is like the checker’s math problem:  what bills and coins do you put in your change drawer to make change for a 100 dollar bill, for every possible dollar and cents total up to $99.99?  This means that a certain number of 1’s, 2’s, 10’s, etc., are necessary as part of the set to achieve each sum sought.

I admit that I did not try to add up the number(s) for each and every sum, 1 through 2060, but I do believe that it can be done without using any of the 27 numbers more than once.  At least I have yet to find a sum (1 – 2060) that cannot be generated within the set this way.  But certainly any other number can be generated if you use one or more of the 27 numbers more than once (given the presence of 1’s).

And what are the odds against having a set of 27 values which can sum to each and every integer up to and including the total value, as do the numerical values representing the first-letters of apostle names and appellations?  The odds against picking up a particular Greek letter character are 1 in 24 as there are 24 characters with sounds.  Odds against gaining two critical letters are 1 in 24 multiplied by 1 in 24, or 1 in 576, and so on.  The odds against gaining critical letters (enough of values 1 and 2, etc.) is multiplied by the odds against a factor of 7-7-4-4-5 in two places. So 1 in 3920 x 1 in 3920 x 1 in 24 x 1 in 24 = very conservatively, 1 in 8,851,046,400.  So the overall odds against the apostles’ names are at least 1 in 8 billion.

Nothing is proven by this of course, because we know from experience that people do sometimes win the lottery!  Coincidences can happen.

Also, the apostle values less than 10 add up to 40, a very special number in the Bible.  I had to throw that in.

EZRA CHAPTER 2

As a result of manipulation with Sower’s numbers (100, 60, 30), a sum of products is obtained from Ezra 2:1-60, the list of numbers of returning exiles, that contains the factor “seventy times seven,” found in Matthew 18:22 (footnote NRSV).  This Ezra result has something in common with the results for the apostles’ lists and the Ezekiel temple measurements above:  all results contain the common factor 40 x 7 x 7, special numbers in the Bible.

Here is a block of 42 numbers, in the order presented in Ezra chapter 2 (NRSV), arranged in three sets of 14 numbers each, and summed:

Set 1

2172, 372, 775, 2812, 1254, 945, 760, 642, 623, 1222, 666, 2056, 454, 98,

Sum 1 = 14,851

Set 2

323, 112, 223, 95, 123, 56, 128, 42, 743, 621, 122, 223, 52, 156,

Sum 2 = 3,019

Set 3

1254, 320, 725, 345, 3630, 973, 1052, 1247, 1017, 74, 128, 139, 392, 652,

Sum 3 = 11,948

None of these sums are evenly divisible by 7.

Using the “100, 60, 30” in the Sower’s Parables, Matthew 13:8 and Matthew 13:23:

100 x sum 1 = 100 x 14,851 = 1,485,100

60 x sum 2 = 60 x 3,019 = 181,140

30 x sum 3 = 30 x 11,948 = 358,440

Sum of products = 2,024,680

2,024,680 = 1033 x (23 x 5 x 72)

Or 1033 x 7 x 7 x 40; seven and forty being special numbers in the Bible.

What are the odds against a common factor of “7 x 7 x 40” happening in three different parts of the BibleEzra chapter 2 – the list of returning exiles, Ezekiel temple measurements, and the combined lists of apostles in both Mark and Luke?

We can readily see that the value 23 x 5 x 72 = 1960, will occur only once in every 1960 integers in sequence.  The probability of this happening in three different parts of the Bible is 1 in 1960 multiplied by 1 in 1960 multiplied by 1 in 1960 or (1/1960)3 or 1 in 7,529,536,000.  Odds against are more than 1 in 7.5 billion!

It is interesting to see these sevens appearing, but I remind myself that coincidences can happen!

REVELATION CHAPTERS 11-13

As a result of manipulation with Sower’s numbers (100, 60, 30), a sum of products is obtained from Revelation 11:2-13:5 (NRSV), that contains not the factor “seventy times seven,” but a grand 7 x 7 x 7 or seven-cubed!

Taking a clue from my Ezra chapter 2 experience above, where the block of 42 numbers is immediately followed by the words, “forty-two,” I searched for the two instances of “42” in Revelation I had noticed earlier.  These mark the beginning and end of a group of 21 numbers arranged here in the order presented in Revelation, in three sets of 7 numbers each, and summed.  For this group (unlike Ezekiel above) “half” is a number:

Set 1

42, 2, 1260, 2, 2, 3.5, 2

Sum 1 = 1,313.5

Set 2

3.5, 7000, 24, 12, 7, 10, 7

Sum 2 = 7,063.5

Set 3

1260, 2, 0.5, 10, 7, 10, 42

Sum 3 = 1,331.5

None of these sums are evenly divisible by 7.

Using the “100, 60, 30” in the Sower’s Parables, Matthew 13:8 and Matthew 13:23:

100 x sum 1 = 100 x 1,313.5 = 131,350

60 x sum 2 = 60 x 7,063.5 = 423,810

30 x sum 3 = 30 x 1,331.5 = 39,945

Sum of products = 595,105 = 347 x 5 x 7 x 7 x 7

Seven-cubed!  The context here is that seven is a special number in the Bible.

What are the odds against a common factor of “5 x 7 x 7” happening in four different parts of the Bible:  in Ezra chapter 2 – the list of returning exiles, in the Ezekiel temple measurements, in the combined lists of apostles in both Mark and Luke, and in Revelation?

We can readily see that the value 5 x 72 = 245, will occur only once in every 245 integers in sequence.  The probability of this happening in four different parts of the Bible, is 1 in 245 raised to the fourth power or 1 in 3,603,000,625.  1 in 3.6 billion!

Now with this fourth instance of multiple sevens appearing with the application of Sower’s numbers (100, 60, 30), I have to ask myself if it could just be a coincidence.  Yes, of course it could just be a coincidence!

LOAVES AND FISHES

This next finding comes from combining the six loaves and fishes stories in all four books of the Gospel together.  This certainly challenges the prevailing popular theory that all four books were written independently.  (Recall that the apostles’ lists above likewise are based on more than one book.)  So yes, it may be important to read the books of the Gospel together!

I had written about the six loaves and fishes stories before, but I had not noticed until now that there are 49 numbers in those stories.  Realizing I had 49 values gave me encouragement to proceed further – as 49 = 7 x 7, and seven is a special number in the Bible.

Here are the 49 values in the order presented in the text (NRSV including footnote):

Matthew 14:  5, 2, 5, 2, 12, 5000,

Matthew 15:  3, 7, 7, 7, 4000

Matthew 16 (a summary of two feedings):  5, 5000, 7, 4000

Mark 6:  200, 5, 2, 100, 50, 5, 2, 2, 12, 5000

Mark 8:  3, 7, 7, 7, 4000

Mark 8 (a summary of two feedings):  5, 5000, 12, 7, 4000, 7

Luke 9:  5, 2, 5000, 50, 5, 2, 12

John 6:  200, 5, 2, 5000, 5, 12

However, how was I to get three sets of numbers from 49, when 49 is not evenly divisible by 3?  As with the group of 49 in Exodus above, I tried to find ways to consolidate, but to no avail.  As I was shutting down my computer, disappointed, this text appeared on the screen (because I had been looking at it earlier):

Jesus is reported saying, “Do you still not perceive? Do you not remember the five loaves for the five thousand, and how many baskets you gathered?  Or the seven loaves for the four thousand, and how many baskets you gathered?” (Matthew 16:9-10 (NRSV))

How many baskets?  How many baskets?  Well, I suddenly realized that two numbers were missing and I had to supply the missing numbers – the numbers for the baskets.  These basket numbers are in other verses and are given below in brackets.

I also found that I needed to cast off the “thousands” as I had done in an earlier post when I found that the numbers in Mark’s summary statement in 8:19-20, sum to 40, a very special number in the Bible, if the thousands are cast off; 5000 becomes 5 and 4000 becomes 4, and you get forty:  5 + 5 + 12 + 7 + 4 + 7 = 40

So here are the loaves and fishes group of 49 values with two added “basket” values in brackets for a total of 51 values, with thousands cast off, arranged in the order presented in the text, in three sets of 17 values each, summed:

Set 1

5, 2, 5, 2, 12, 5…, 3, 7, 7, 7, 4…, 5, 5…, [12], 7, 4…, [7],

Sum 1 = 99

Set 2

200, 5, 2, 100, 50, 5, 2, 2, 12, 5…, 3, 7, 7, 7, 4…, 5, 5…,

Sum 2 = 421

Set 3

12, 7, 4…, 7, 5, 2, 5…, 50, 5, 2, 12, 200, 5, 2, 5…, 5, 12,

Sum 3 = 340

None of these sums are evenly divisible by 7.

Now for the first time in this post, instead of using the “100, 60, 30” in the Sower’s Parables to bring forth biblical sevens, I use the reverse in the Sower’s Parables, 30, 60, 100 (Mark 4:8 and 4:20).

30 x sum 1 = 30 x 99 = 2,970

60 x sum 2 = 60 x 421 = 25,260

100 x sum 3 = 100 x 340 = 34,000

Sum of products = 62,230 = 7 x 7 x 5 x 2 x 127

Once again, I get a resultant sum that is evenly divisible by “seventy times seven,” found in Matthew 18:22 (footnote NRSV). -18:22-

What are the odds of finding “seventy times seven” four times:  (1) in the loaves and fishes, (2) in Ezra chapter 2, (3) in Ezekiel temple measurements, and (4) in the apostles’ lists?

We can readily see that the value 2 x 5 x 72 = 490, will occur only once in every 490 integers in sequence.  The probability of this happening in four different parts of the Bible, is (1/490)4 or 1 in 57,648,010,000.  Odds against are more than 1 in 57 billion!  That’s astronomical!

But I am not getting excited about this, because I know that coincidences can happen, and all this could be just a coincidence.

Some more notes on the loaves and fishes:  I was not sure if Matthew should be considered the first book of the Gospel or Mark (which says it is first (Mark 1:1)).  No matter whether I place Mark’s or Matthew’s numbers first, no matter whether I calculate 100, 60, 30 or the reverse, there are resultant seventies, and in the case of Mark-first with 100, 60, 30, also a “2 to the seventh power”!  Believe me, I feel that there is something very unusual about the loaves and fishes numbers; if it is not all just a coincidence.

1 ESDRAS CHAPTER 9 ON MIXED MARRIAGES

1Esdras Chapter 9:19-35 (NRSV) lists the names and clan names of those men who had married Pagan women.  At first it would seem to be a set of 120 values, deceptively easy to decipher, the values being the numerical values of the Greek first-letters of each name; 120 being auspicious as 3 x 40, special numbers in the Bible.

There may be actually as many as 124 values.  Notes on which values to select:  Do not include Levites, or singers, or gatekeepers as these are group names, not individual names.  Include Israel, which can be a person’s name as well as a group name.  Do not include Kelita, an alternative name for Kelaiah.  For the “brothers” count two brothers (each Greek first-letter Α, value 1); this is compatible with the apostles’ set above where each “brother” is counted.

Only one of the listed names is a double name (Σιμων Χοσαμαιος) translated as Simon Chosamaeus (1Esdras 9:32).  This is the only guy with a last name.  I teased the Greek last name apart in the Google translator and got three modern Greek words:  Χοσ “audio,” σαμ “sum,” and μαιος “May” (the month).  Could “sum” be a clue?  “Audio”?  “’Some fell into good soil, and when it grew, it produced a hundredfold.’ As he said this, he called out, ‘Let anyone with ears to hear listen!’”  (Sower’s parable in Luke 8:8)  The word “sum” is particularly intriguing but I don’t know enough about Greek to know for sure if this could be a clue urging me to make some sums??

The numerical value of the Greek first-letter of each of these 120 names is shown here in brackets (for more information see the Greek numerals chart under “Background” further below).  The bracketed value for a name is shown after it.  Three subsets of 40 first-letter-name-values are arranged here in the order in which they occur, and summed:

Subset 1

19 ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Ἰησοῦ [10] τοῦ Ιωσεδεκ [10] καὶ τῶν ἀδελφῶν [1, 1 (two brothers)] Μασηας [40] καὶ Ελεαζαρος [5] καὶ Ιωριβος [10] καὶ Ιωδανος [10]  20 καὶ ἐπέβαλον τὰς χεῖρας ἐκβαλεῖν τὰς γυναῖκας αὐτῶν καὶ εἰς ἐξιλασμὸν κριοὺς ὑπὲρ τῆς ἀγνοίας αὐτῶν  21 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Εμμηρ [5] Ανανιας [1] καὶ Ζαβδαιος [7] καὶ Μανης [40] καὶ Σαμαιος [200] καὶ Ιιηλ [10] καὶ Αζαριας [1]  22 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Φαισουρ [500] Ελιωναις [5] Μασσιας [40] Ισμαηλος [10] καὶ Ναθαναηλος [50] καὶ Ωκιδηλος [800] καὶ Σαλθας [200]  23 καὶ ἐκ τῶν Λευιτῶν [(Levites not selected] Ιωζαβδος [10] καὶ Σεμεϊς [200] καὶ Κωλιος  [20] οὗτος Καλιτας [alternate name not selected] καὶ Παθαιος [80] καὶ Ωουδας [800] καὶ Ιωανας [10] 24 ἐκ τῶν ἱεροψαλτῶν Ελιασιβος [5] Βακχουρος [2] 25 ἐκ τῶν θυρωρῶν Σαλλουμος [200] καὶ Τολβανης [300] 26 ἐκ τοῦ Ισραηλ [10] ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Φορος [500] Ιερμας [10] καὶ Ιεζιας [10] καὶ Μελχιας [40] καὶ Μιαμινος [40] καὶ Ελεαζαρος [5] καὶ Ασιβιας [1]

Sum of subset 1 = 4,199

Subset 2

καὶ Βανναιας [2] 27 ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Ηλαμ [8] Ματανιας [40] καὶ Ζαχαριας [7] Ιεζριηλος [10] καὶ Ωβαδιος [800] καὶ Ιερεμωθ [10] καὶ Ηλιας [8] 28 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Ζαμοθ [7] Ελιαδας [5] Ελιασιμος [5] Οθονιας [70] Ιαριμωθ [10] καὶ Σαβαθος [200] καὶ Ζερδαιας [7] 29 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Βηβαι [2] Ιωαννης [10] καὶ Ανανιας [1] καὶ Ζαβδος [7] καὶ Εμαθις [5] 30 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Μανι [40] Ωλαμος [800] Μαμουχος [40] Ιεδαιος [10] Ιασουβος [10] καὶ Ασαηλος [1] καὶ Ιερεμωθ [10] 31 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Αδδι [1] Νααθος [50] καὶ Μοοσσιας [40] Λακκουνος [30] καὶ Ναϊδος [50] καὶ Βεσκασπασμυς [2] καὶ Σεσθηλ [200] καὶ Βαλνουος [2] καὶ Μανασσηας [40] 32 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Ανναν [1] Ελιωνας [5] καὶ Ασαιας [1] καὶ Μελχιας [40]

Sum of subset 2 = 2,587

Subset 3

καὶ Σαββαιας [200] καὶ Σιμων [200] Χοσαμαιος [600] 33 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Ασομ [1] Μαλτανναιος [40] καὶ Ματταθιας [40] καὶ Σαβανναιους [200] καὶ Ελιφαλατ [5] καὶ Μανασσης [40] καὶ Σεμεϊ [200] 34 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Βαανι [2] Ιερεμιας [10] Μομδιος [40] Μαηρος [40] Ιουηλ [10] Μαμδαι [40] καὶ Πεδιας [80] καὶ Ανως [1] Καραβασιων [20] καὶ Ελιασιβος [5] καὶ Μαμνιταναιμος [40] Ελιασις [5] Βαννους [2] Ελιαλις [5] Σομεϊς [200] Σελεμιας [200] Ναθανιας [50] καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Εζωρα [5] Σεσσις [200] Εζριλ [5] Αζαηλος [1] Σαματος [200] Ζαμβρις [7] Ιωσηπος [10] 35 καὶ ἐκ τῶν υἱῶν Νοομα [50] Μαζιτιας [40] Ζαβαδαιας [7] Ηδαις [8] Ιουηλ [10] Βαναιας [2]

Sum of subset 3 = 2,821

Greek taken from:  http://en.katabiblon.com/us/index.php?text=LXX&book=1Esd&ch=9

Applying the Sower’s numbers 100-60-30 and 30-60-100 (Sower’s verses one click):

100 x sum 1 = 100 x 4,199 = 419,900

60 x sum 2 = 60 x 2,587 = 155,220

30 x sum 3 = 30 x 2,821 = 84,630

Sum of products = 659,750; factor 70

30 x sum 1 = 30 x 4,199 = 125,970

60 x sum 2 = 60 x 2,587 = 155,220

100 x sum 3 = 100 x 2,821 = 282,100

Sum of products = 563,290; factor 70

Add both sums together

659,750 + 563,290 = 1,223,040 = 7 x 7 x 5 x 3 x 13 x (2 to the seventh power)

Well, I don’t know if 2 to the seventh power could be special.  Is seven of two as special as two of seven?  Well, I have both.  Also in there is the factor 70 x 7.  I’m particularly glad for the appearance of 70 x 7 reminding me of “seventy times seven,” found in Matthew 18:22 (footnote NRSV). -18:22-

You know, I almost missed that 2 to the seventh power.  Then I took the clue “month of May” and divided by 5.  (May was the fifth month in the Julian calendar?)

Odds of gathering a 70 x 7 and also a 27?  Perhaps 1 in 62,720.

Maybe all just a coincidence.

1 CORINTHIANS LOVE RIDDLE

And now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; and the greatest of these is love.” (1 Corinthians 13:13 (NRSV))  The previous verse (13:12) contains the word “riddle” (NRSV footnote)

How can I resist looking for a number puzzle when I see “riddle” and “three”?

Here are faith, hope, love in Greek:

πίστις, ἐλπίς, ἀγάπη (from 1 Corinthians 13:13 (SBL Greek New Testament))

This puzzle, by Paul the Apostle, is short and sweet:

I take the numerical value of the Greek first-letter from each of “faith, hope, love.”

Π = 80

Ε = 5

Α = 1

Using the Sower’s numbers 30-60-100 and 100-60-30 (Sower’s verses one click):

30 x 80 = 2,400

60 x 5 = 300

100 x 1 = 100

Sum of products = 2,800 = 70 x 40; both special numbers in the Bible.

100 x 80 = 8,000

60 x 5 = 300

30 x 1 = 30

Sum of products = 8,330 = 70 x 7 x 17

A factor of 490 or “seventy times seven” (found in Matthew 18:22 (footnote NRSV) -18:22-”).

The 17 maybe is a bonus seven (10 + 7).

Probability of finding the 7 x 7 factor in a sum of products is, very conservatively, 1 in 7-squared or 1 in 49.  Less conservatively, the odds against finding two instances of 70 x 7 are (1 in 490)2 or 1 in 240,100.

But of course finding sevens and seventies could be just a coincidence.

REVELATION’S CUBE-CITY GEMSTONES

I thought that the list of 12 precious stones on the cube-city’s foundation-facades (Revelation 21:19-20) might be a puzzle in some way, especially when I read the TNIV footnote that the “identification of some of these precious stones is uncertain.”  So the spelling is off??  Since Greek numerals at that time were written with letters (see Greek numerals chart further below), it seems that the spelling of the gemstones may have been altered to correspond to certain numbers.

Unlike other solutions above where only the numerical values of the Greek first-letters are used, here I sum the numerical values of all letters in each gemstone name to gain 12 values for the 12 gemstones.  These values are shown next in brackets after each gemstone, arranged in three sets of four values in the order in which they appear in the text, and each set summed.

Set 1

οἱ θεμέλιοι τοῦ τείχους τῆς πόλεως παντὶ λίθῳ τιμίῳ κεκοσμημένοι· ὁ θεμέλιος ὁ πρῶτος ἴασπις, [501] ὁ δεύτερος σάπφιρος, [1161] ὁ τρίτος χαλκηδών, [1513] ὁ τέταρτος σμάραγδος, [619]

Sum 1 = 3,794

Set 2

ὁ πέμπτος σαρδόνυξ, [885] ὁ ἕκτος σάρδιον, [435] ὁ ἕβδομος χρυσόλιθος, [1689] ὁ ὄγδοος βήρυλλος, [840]

Sum 2 = 3,849

Set 3

ὁ ἔνατος τοπάζιον, [588] ὁ δέκατος χρυσόπρασος, [2021] ὁ ἑνδέκατος ὑάκινθος, [760] ὁ δωδέκατος ἀμέθυστος [1225]

Sum 3 = 4,594

From the SBL Greek New Testament-SBL-

Only the first sum is evenly divisible by 7.

Using “100, 60, 30” in the Sower’s Parables, Matthew 13:8 and Matthew 13:23:

100 x sum 1 = 100 x 3,794 = 379,400

60 x sum 2 = 60 x 3,849 = 230,940

30 x sum 3 = 30 x 4,594 = 137,820

Sum of products = 748,160 = 7 x 5 x 167 x 27

There is a factor of 70, and also a factor of 2 to the seventh power.

Is seven of two just as desirable as 2 of 7?

Then I use the reverse in the Sower’s Parables numbers, 30, 60, 100 (Mark 4:8 and 4:20):

30 x sum 1 = 30 x 3,794 = 113,820

60 x sum 2 = 60 x 3,849 = 230,940

100 x sum 3 = 100 x 4,594 = 459,400

Sum of products = 804,160; factor of 70

But watch what happens when I add the two sums of products together:

748,160 + 804,160 = 1,552,320; factor of 70 x 7

This joint sum is evenly divisible by “seventy times seven,” (Matthew 18:22 (footnote NRSV). -18:22-).

It is also evenly divisible by “144” (found in Revelation 21:17, just a couple of verses earlier, and found also as 144,000); 144 is equal to 12 x 12, a special number in the Bible.

It is evenly divisible by “616” (a variant for the number of the beast in Revelation 13:18).

It is evenly divisible by “1,260” (found in Revelation 11:3 and 12:6).

It is evenly divisible by “24 x 24” (24 thrones and 24 elders being found in Revelation).

It is evenly divisible by “42 x 42” (42 being found twice in Revelation).

It is evenly divisible by “60,” a special number in the Bible.

It is evenly divisible by “40,” a special number in the Bible.

It is evenly divisible by “30,” a special number in the Bible.

It is evenly divisible by “11,” the name of the Twelve after Judas left (six citations).

When I see how versatile the joint sum of 1,552,320 is, I have some more confidence that the biblical author may have wanted it to be discovered by readers; at least by those readers ready to engage in a valuable exercise to promote awareness, and what else do we hope to achieve in this life?

Now with this seventh instance of my discovering a “seventy times seven” in the Bible with Sower’s Parables numbers, I have to ask, what are the odds of gaining seven instances of “seventy times seven”?  We can readily see that the odds of a factor of 7 x 7 are 1 in 49.  The probability of seven instances of this is 1 in 49 to the seventh power, or 1 in 678,223,072,849.  That is 1 in 678 billion.  Likewise, the probability of gaining seven of “seventy times seven” is 490 to the seventh power, or 6,782,230,728,490,000,000 (or 6.78e+18).  Astronomical!

There does appear to be a non-random repeating numerical pattern in the Bible, but of course, it could just be a coincidence.

Caveat:  If the occurrence of sevens is not just a coincidence, then I’ll guess there is some mathematical method involved, but not necessarily the method I have explained in this post.

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BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Compare Matthew 10:1-4, Mark 3:13-19, Luke 6:12-16, Acts 1:13 (NRSV) one click

 

 

NAMES OF TWELVE APOSTLES

 

Matthew 10:1-4 Mark 3:13-19 Luke 6:12-16 Acts 1:13
1 – Simon, also  known as Peter

 

[Σ]ίμων ὁ λεγόμενος  [Π]έτρος

1 – Simon (to whom  he gave the name  Peter)

 

Σίμωνι Πέτρον

1 – Simon, whom  he named Peter

 

Σίμωνα ὃν καὶ  ὠνόμασεν Πέτρον

 

 

1 – Peter

 

Πέτρος

 

 

2 – and his brother  Andrew

 

[Ἀ]νδρέας ὁ  [ἀ]δελφὸς αὐτοῦ

4 – Andrew

 

Ἀνδρέαν

2 – and his brother  Andrew

 

Ἀνδρέαν τὸν  ἀδελφὸν αὐτοῦ

4 – Andrew

 

Ἀνδρέας

3 – James, son of  Zebedee

 

[Ἰ]άκωβος ὁ τοῦ  [Ζ]εβεδαίου

2 – James, son of  Zebedee

 

Ἰάκωβον τὸν τοῦ  Ζεβεδαίου

3 – James

 

Ἰάκωβον

3 – James

 

Ἰάκωβος

4 – and his brother  John

 

Ἰωάννης ὁ ἀδελφὸς  αὐτοῦ

3 – John, the brother  of James (to whom  he gave the name  Boanerges, that is,  Sons of Thunder)

 

[Ἰ]ωάννην τὸν  [ἀ]δελφὸν τοῦ  [Ἰ]ακώβου (καὶ  ἐπέθηκεν αὐτοῖς  ὀνόματα (ὄνομα)  Βοανηργές, ὅ ἐστιν  [Υ]ἱοὶ [Β]ροντῆς)

4 – John

 

Ἰωάννην

2 – John

 

Ἰωάννης

(SBL Greek NT   footnote has an  alternate reverse  order James and  John)

5 – Philip

 

[Φ]ίλιππος

5 – Philip

 

Φίλιππον

5 – Philip

 

Φίλιππον

5 – Philip

 

Φίλιππος

6 – Bartholomew

 

[Β]αρθολομαῖος

6 – Bartholomew

 

Βαρθολομαῖον

6 – Bartholomew

 

Βαρθολομαῖον

7 – Bartholomew

 

Βαρθολομαῖος

7 – Thomas

 

[Θ]ωμᾶς

8 – Thomas

 

Θωμᾶν

8 – Thomas

 

Θωμᾶν

6 – Thomas

 

Θωμᾶς

8 – Matthew the tax  collector

 

[Μ]αθθαῖος ὁ  [τ]ελώνης

7 – Matthew

 

Μαθθαῖον

7 – Matthew

 

Μαθθαῖον

8 – Matthew

 

Μαθθαῖος

9 – James, son of  Alphaeus

 

[Ἰ]άκωβος ὁ τοῦ  [Ἁ]λφαίου

9 – James, son of   Alphaeus

 

Ἰάκωβον τὸν τοῦ  Ἁλφαίου

9 – James, son of  Alphaeus

 

Ἰάκωβον Ἁλφαίου  (+ τὸν τοῦ)

9 – James, son of  Alphaeus

 

Ἰάκωβος Ἁλφαίου

10 – Thaddaeus   (Other ancient  authorities read  Lebbaeus,* or  Lebbaeus called  Thaddaeus)

 

[Θ]αδδαῖος  (Λεββαῖος ὁ  ἐπικληθεὶς  Θαδδαῖος)

10 – Thaddaeus

 

Θαδδαῖον

11 – Simon the  Cananaean

 

[Σ]ίμων ὁ  [Κ]αναναῖος  (Κανανίτης)

11 – Simon the  Cananaean

 

Σίμωνα τὸν  Καναναῖον  (Κανανίτην)

10 – Simon, who  was called the  Zealot*

 

[Σ]ίμωνα τὸν  καλούμενον  [Ζ]ηλωτὴν

10 – Simon the  Zealot

 

Σίμων ὁ ζηλωτὴς

11 – Judas son of  James*

 

[Perhaps this  should have the  same NRSV  footnote as in Acts,  “Or the brother  of.”]

 

[Ἰ]ούδαν  [Ἰ]ακώβου

11 – Judas son of   James (Or the  brother of)

 

Ἰούδας Ἰακώβου

12 – Judas Iscariot,  the one who  betrayed him

 

[Ἰ]ούδας ὁ  [Ἰ]σκαριώτης

12 – Judas Iscariot,  who betrayed him

 

Ἰούδαν Ἰσκαριώθ  (Ἰσκαριώτην)

12 – Judas Iscariot,  who became a  traitor

 

Ἰούδαν Ἰσκαριὼθ  (Ἰσκαριώτην)

Acts 1:26 Matthias  replaces Judas  Iscariot

 

Μαθθίαν

English names are from the NRSV.

Greek is from the SBL Greek New Testament.

The number shown is that name’s order in the list of names in that book.

Inconsistent names are shown with an asterisk (*).

Bracketed, bolded first-letters of names and appellations comprise the set of 27.

 

When I make the apostles’ names set of 27, I use the first-letter only of each name and appellation.

I count Simon-Cananaean and I count Simon-Zealot, and I count Simon-Peter as a Simon.

I count “brother” (ἀδελφὸς) appellations, one each for Andrew and John.  I count the explanation of the meaning “Sons of Thunder” (Υἱοὶ) and (Βροντῆς).  As far as I can tell (and I don’t know much about Greek), these are the only “son” or “brother” words actually found in the Greek apostle lists, although the translators add plenty more usually, where the Greek only says “of,” “him of,” or is silent.

The chart above shows the various names and appellations for the 12 apostles in four books of the New Testament.  The first-letters of 27 Greek names and appellations I selected for the set are bolded and bracketed.  When I pick a first-letter for a particular name or appellation, I do not pick it again when it is repeated in a different book.  But names and appellations that are found only in either Mark or Luke must be combined, otherwise this set does not exist.  All those I picked in Matthew are also in either Mark or Luke.

How many names are there for the twelve apostles?  There are more than 12 names for these 12 men.

Compare Matthew 10:1-4, Mark 3:13-19, Luke 6:12-16, Acts 1:13 (NRSV) one click

Thaddaeus vs. Judas-James (13th name for 12 apostles):  Thaddaeus is listed in Matthew and Mark only.  Perhaps this person is the same person as Judas, son (or brother) of James in Luke and Acts.  Perhaps not.  Some like to conflate the names making a person named St. Jude Thaddaeus.

Thaddaeus vs. Lebbaeus (14th name for 12 apostles):  In some manuscripts it is “Lebbaeus” instead of Thaddaeus OR “Lebbaeus called Thaddaeus” (NRSV footnote for Matthew 10:3).  Since the names are associated in one (or more?) manuscripts but not elsewhere, that is not conclusive.  Thaddaeus and Lebbaeus may be two different men.  But because one of them may have been added later by an editing copyist, I chose only one of them for the set and I chose Thaddaeus because his first letter (Greek Θ) matches that of Thomas.  Basically, I like the way the set works without Lebbaeus.

Simon-Cananaean vs. Simon-Zealot (15th name for 12 apostles):  Notice that in addition to the first Simon listed (who was renamed Peter), there are two other Simons.  These are Simon the Cananaean (Matthew, Mark) and Simon called the Zealot (Luke, Acts).  Could these two be the same man?  “Zealot” means a Jew in rebellion against the Roman occupation.  A Cananaean or Canaanite was a non-Jew; an inhabitant of the Land of Canaan.  A non-Jew could be in rebellion also, but I rather doubt he would be called a “Zealot.”

I did notice that the last name of Judas Iscariot is spelled two different ways in the Greek (judging from the footnote??), but I am too clever to be tricked into thinking that he could be two – there is only one betrayer.

________________________________

Wikipedia Greek numerals

Letter Value Letter Value Letter Value
αʹ 1 ιʹ 10 ρʹ 100
βʹ 2 κʹ 20 σʹ 200
γʹ 3 λʹ 30 τʹ 300
δʹ 4 μʹ 40 υʹ 400
εʹ 5 νʹ 50 φʹ 500
ϝʹ or ϛʹ or στʹ 6 ξʹ 60 χʹ 600
ζʹ 7 οʹ 70 ψʹ 700
ηʹ 8 πʹ 80 ωʹ 800
θʹ 9 ϟʹ 90 ϡʹ 900

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_numerals

More Greek numerals http://www.foundalis.com/lan/grknum.htm

________________________________

DECONSTRUCTING THE SPECIAL NUMBER (Ezekiel and apostles)

It was my decision to use the biblical refrain 100, 60, 30, to construct sums of products, and perhaps such a step might not have been foreseen by the biblical authors.  But it is not enough to merely have a sum of products derived from 100, 60, 30 (each product including factors 2 and 5 contributed by these numbers).  Rather the sum of products must have combined factors of 24 x 5 x 7.2

Sower’s sums take the form of:  190 + 30x; or 290 + 30x; or 390 + 30x.  This is because excess multiples of 100 in blocks of 300 can be evenly divided by 30.  Once I have a special number with factors of 24 x 5 x 7,2 how can I deconstruct the special number to obtain three sets of other numbers to be multiplied by 30, 60, 100?

Let numbers containing the factor 24 x 5 x 72 take the form of (3920)y.

The following formula shows the intersection of values with both desired features, (1) having a factor of 24 x 5 x 7,2 and (2) being a sum of 30, 60, 100, products:

190* + 30x = 3920y

x = (3920y – 190*)/ 30

*  either 190, 290, or 390

The possible values that have both desired features are as follows:

3920, 7840, 11760, 15680, 19600, 23520, 27440 . . . . .  and so on.

Example:

Let y = 2; then x = ((3920)(2) – 190)/30 = 255

The sum of products in this example is 7840 and there must be at least 1 of 30, 1 of 60, 1 of 100, for a subtotal of 190.  Then the remaining subtotal is 255 x 30, and this can be broken down further as I decide, into 30, 60, and 100 products; as follows, 100 of 30 (equivalent to 30 of 100 – need blocks of 300 here), 140 of 30 (equivalent to 70 of 60), and 15 of 30.

So not forgetting the 190 subtotal above (1 of 30, 1 of 60, 1 of 100), my sum of products in this example is (30 x 16) + (60 x 71) + (100 x 31) = 7840

I can select many other combinations of products, as I wish, to gain the example sum 7840.  Once I have three products I like, then I can arbitrarily break each down into any “measures” or values I wish.

The special number with factor 24 x 5 x 72 will magically appear with divisor “seventy times seven” as long as that was the special number I started with.  (Both sums of products above (66,640 and 231,280) are evenly divisible by “seventy times seven,” found in Matthew 18:22 (footnote NRSV))

Notice how many times “seven” appears in the New Testament, especially in Revelation! -7-  Certainly “seven,” “seventy,” and “seventh,” are special to the biblical authors.  And this is the context for the appearance of a common factor of seven times seven.  Nothing is proven, as all may be just coincidence, but I am bothering to write this up nevertheless.

________________________________

NRSV used throughout this page unless otherwise noted.

________________________________

Posted on:  December 26, 2013

Updated on:  September 24, 2016

 

 

One Response to SEVENS FROM SOWER’S PARABLES NUMBERS

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