SOWER’S SEVENS BY THE POPES

2016 01 07 Luke 11.34

Pope Francis and Pope Benedict XVI both have Sower’s Sevens in their documents.

Well, I am a bit miffed to find out that I am not the first in today’s world to know about Sower’s Sevens.  When did the Vatican discover Sower’s Sevens?  Certainly Pope Benedict’s use predates my discovery of Sower’s Sevens.  So we both discovered this independently, or is the Vatican’s knowledge of Sower’s Sevens a tradition passed along over the centuries from before the time of Jesus?

What are Sower’s Sevens?  That is my term for number patterns that exist in sacred texts, such as the Bible which have hidden sevens.  The Sower’s Sevens (“70 x 7”) are released by simple arithmetic using the numbers in the Sower’s parables in the Gospel, that is, 30 – 60 – 100 and 100 – 60 – 30.  These numbers are like a key that unlock the sevens.

I congratulate these popes for reproducing the biblical number patterns in their papal documents.  While I know how to release the sevens, I’m not sure I would have the patience to put sevens into a document.  Certainly the presence of “70 x 7” in the papal documents highlights devotion to the Bible.  However, doesn’t it take a certain compulsiveness to be hiding sevens?  Fortunately for the popes, there are people like me willing to look for hidden sevens.  Otherwise, who would appreciate all their efforts?

 

Solution 1:  Pope Francis’ AMORIS LÆTITIA (On Love in the Family) March 19, 2016

It quickly became apparent to me that there might be hidden sevens when I noticed that Francis’ book starts off with a block of 7 items and the book concludes with a prayer with 7 paragraphs.  Also the book has 9 chapters.  A number divisible by 3 is a key to releasing hidden sevens (9/3 = 3).

What sort of organization would encourage or require its leaders to hide sevens in documents as what, a signature, a branding, a watermark?   Maybe just a way to honor the authors of the Bible.

Here is a step by step description of how to release the “70 x 7” in Francis’ book:

The Index at the end of the book very helpfully lists the chapters 1 – 9, and for each chapter the numbered items in it.  For example, in chapter 1, there are items 8 – 30.  Take the difference and you get 22 (30 minus 8 = 22).  Do likewise for all nine chapters.

Chapter-item values are arranged in three subsets as follows, beginning with chapter 1, and each subset is summed:

Chapter 1, 8 through 30, difference is 22

Chapter 2, 31 through 57, difference is 26

Chapter 3, 58 through 88, difference is 30

Sum of values for chapters 1 – 3 = 78

Chapter 4, 89 through 164, difference is 75

Chapter 5, 165 through 198, difference is 33

Chapter 6, 199 through 258, difference is 59

Sum of values for chapters 4 – 6 = 167

Chapter 7, 259 through 290, difference is 31

Chapter 8, 291 through 312, difference is 21

Chapter 9, 313 through 325, difference is 12

Sum of values for chapters 7 – 9 = 64

Next I use the Sower’s numbers (100 – 60 – 30) and multiply the first sum by 100, the second sum by 60, the third sum by 30:

100 x 78 = 7,800

60 x 167 = 10,020

30 x 64 = 1,920

Sum of products = 19,740, factor of 7

Next the reverse.  I use the Sower’s numbers 30 – 60 – 100:

30 x 78 = 2,340

60 x 167 = 10,020

100 x 64 = 6,400

Sum of products = 18,760, factor of 7

At this point I usually sum the sums of products.  Since that didn’t work I took the difference, in keeping with what seemed to be a theme of subtracting.

Subtracting 19,740 minus 18,760 = 980, factors of 2 x 70 x 7

The sheer beauty of this puzzle and sublime result amaze me.  It is brilliant.

 

Solution 2:  Pope Benedict’s Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, June 28, 2005.

It quickly became apparent to me there might be Sower’s Sevens when I noticed that Appendix B to the Catechism’s Compendium contained 12 items.  Twelve is a special number in the Bible and also divisible by 3 (12/3 = 4).  I noticed that the last item in the list was not something I recognized as a “Formula of Catholic Doctrine.”  A bogus item, if such it is, may be a clue that there is a number set that was rounded out.

You know, it is fine for us folks to say we can see the Sower’s Sevens in the Bible, as most people these days know that the Bible is not always literal, and it is not a shock to find out that numbers likely were skewed to fit a pattern.  But is a pope allowed to reveal that he knows about Sower’s Sevens?  Benedict reveals his knowing that the Bible is not always literal, by putting such a puzzle into his Compendium (or maybe an underling did it).  Rather, popes are supposed to say that the Bible is the word of God and that not a word of it is suspect.

Interesting that Benedict’s Sower’s Sevens puzzle is first rate as you would expect of an intellectual.  Notice that the sum of sums below equals 70, a special number in the Bible.  The trick is to take only the chapter values and not verse values where there are citations.

Here is a step by step description of how to release the 70 x 7 in Benedict’s Compendium:

The values are arranged in their order in the document into three subsets and each subset is summed:

2, 7 [7:12], 5 [5:3-12], 3

Sum = 17

4, 7, 12, 5

Sum = 28

7, 7, 7, 4

Sum = 25

Sum of sums = 70 !!!

Next I use the Sower’s numbers (100 – 60 – 30) and multiply the first sum by 100, the second sum by 60, the third sum by 30:

100 x 17 = 1,700

60 x 28 = 1,680

30 x 25 = 750

Sum of products = 4,130, factor 70

Next the reverse.  I use the Sower’s numbers 30 – 60 – 100:

30 x 17 = 510

60 x 28 = 1,680

100 x 25 = 2,500

Sum of products = 4,690, factor of 70

Adding the sums of products:

4,130 + 4,690 = 8,820, factor of 18 x 70 x 7

This puzzle is easy to do yet sophisticated.

I am mostly grateful to organizations that purport to lead people to a realization of spiritual truths, as long as they use persuasion and not force, they do not proselytize to make themselves rich, and they realize that despite great learning and great effort, they don’t know much more than the rest of us.

 

Solution 3: The Kensington Rune Stone

I am adding the Kensington Rune Stone here because it reinforces the idea that the Sower’s Sevens have been passed along through the centuries.  The Κoran brings us to the seventh century CE.  The Kensington Rune Stone is dated 1362 CE.

This stone was found near Kensington, Minnesota in the US, and indicates Viking visitors to Minnesota 130 years before Columbus journey to the Americas.  (Geologist Scott Wolter says it is genuine and posits involvement of Templars per Amazon book page and reviews for The Hooked X).

The stone has 12 lines (there’s that 12 again).  It has 6 lines with numbers, with a total of 8 numbers.  The solution is similar to what I found for “Of Aseneth.”  In that text, uneven numbers of values centered on 3 dates.  For the rune stone, the solution is to combine, not the numbers, but rather, lines with their numbers, as follows.

Here are the 12 lines per wikipedia:

The text consists of 9 lines on the face of the stone, and 3 lines on the edge, read as follows:

Front:

Line 1> 8 : göter : ok : 22 : norrmen : po :

Line 2> …o : opdagelsefärd : fro :

Line 3> vinland : of : vest : vi :

Line 4> hade : läger : ved : 2 : skjär : en :

Line 5> dags : rise : norr : fro : deno : sten :

Line 6> vi : var : ok : fiske : en : dagh : äptir :

Line 7> vi : kom : hem : fan : 10 : man : röde :

Line 8> af : blod : og : ded : AVM :

Line 9> frälse : äf : illü.

Side:

Line 10> här : (10) : mans : ve : havet : at : se :

Line 11> äptir : vore : skip : 14 : dagh : rise :

Line 12> from : deno : öh : ahr : 1362 :

The text describes a horrific attack, per wiki translation, “Eight Geats and twenty-two Norwegians on an exploration journey from Vinland to the west. We had camp by two skerries one day’s journey north from this stone. We were [out] to fish one day. After we came home [we] found ten men red of blood and dead. AVM (Ave Virgen Maria) save [us] from evil.  [We] have ten men by the sea to look after our ships, fourteen days’ travel from this island. [In the] year 1362.”

While Wikipedia is not reliable, I am going to accept it for now per this rune.

Solution

Here is a step by step description of how I release the 70 x 7 on the rune stone.

Combine the values in Lines 1 and 4

8, 22, 2

Sum = 32

Combine the values in Lines 7 and 10

10, 10

Sum = 20

Combine the values in Lines 11 and 12

14, 13, 62*

Sum = 89

* The trick here is to take the year “1362” as two values, 13 and 62.  I think this is justified as “and” used to be inserted in dates – “in the year of Our Lord, thirteen hundred and sixty-two” has a nice ring to it.  I don’t know if there is an “and” on the stone.

Next I use the Sower’s numbers (100 – 60 – 30) and multiply the first sum by 100, the second sum by 60, the third sum by 30:

100 x 32 = 3,200

60 x 20 = 1,200

30 x 89 = 2,670

Sum of products = 7,070, factor 70

Well, when I saw that seven thousand and seventy, I knew I was in the right neighborhood.

Next the reverse.  I use the Sower’s numbers 30 – 60 – 100:

30 x 32 = 960

60 x 20 = 1,200

100 x 89 = 8,900

Sum of products = 11,060, factor of 70

Sum of sum of products = 7,070 + 11,060 = 18,130, factor of 37 x 70 x 7

What would Viking Norsemen know of a tradition of Sower’s Sevens found in the Bible, the Κoran, and in today’s Vatican documents?  An online friend has told me that the Knights Templar had dispersed due to attacks on them by the Vatican and thus could have been among Vikings.  I do recall that the Templars had been crusaders in the Holy Land and thus maybe privy to its secrets.  There is mention of a Mary Virgin on the stone.

With this solution, I have now completed 23 examples of Sower’s Sevens.  With all these examples I believe I have a good feel for what is a good puzzle.  This Kensington rune stone number puzzle is perfection, even though I have a preference for subsets with an equal number of values.

 

What are the odds?

What are the odds of getting a “70 x 7” as a factor?  The odds are 1 in 490, but since I add a factor of 10 in the process of doing the arithmetic, the odds are 1 in 49.  What are the odds of getting a “70 x 7” in 23 examples?  The odds are 1 in 7^23 (one in seven to the 23rd power) – astronomical.  For sure I did not do enough sampling to beat the odds.  The Sowers Sevens were embedded in the texts by the writers.

Finding the difference between the sums of products will always yield a 7-factor or zero, even when the sums of products themselves do not contain a 7-factor; however, such difference will not necessarily contain a 7-squared-factor.  Odds of obtaining such randomly at this stage of the process is 1 in 7.  Combined with 1 in 7 odds for a seven-factor from the computation of the sums of products (assuming no more than two of the original sums for a sum of products have 7-factors), the overall odds are 1 in 49.

Reviewing all of my previous 22 examples, I found none where taking a difference between sums of products yielded a 70 x 7.  So maybe Pope Francis (or his editor) has taken a new approach in designing a Sower’s Sevens puzzle?

Can I say definitively that these popes, Francis and Benedict, have imbedded sevens in their documents?  I admit that I would like to have more examples before coming to a conclusion.  However, I do feel fairly confident that there are Sower’s Sevens in the documents, given that I have so many other examples from history and the Vatican has been part of that history – so why wouldn’t they know the numerical foundation of scriptures?  Since I was able to figure out that there are Sower’s Sevens in the Bible, I would hope they have figured it out also after so many hundreds of years.  I am at a loss however, to understand the compulsion to put sevens in documents now in the 21st century.

 

Solution 4: Pope Francis LAUDATO SI’ (On Care For Our Common Home) May 24, 2015

Well, I wrote all that and then decided to take a quick look at Pope Francis’ environmental encyclical Laudato Si.  I’m not sure the following is a solution that could have been what was intended, but it contains an interesting twist.

The solution follows an algorithm similar to that for Francis’ other book, Amoris Laetitia.

Step by step:

Laudato Si has 6 chapters.  For each of two chapters, take the difference in the number of chapter-items.

Chapters 1, 2 = 100 – 17 = 83

Chapters 3, 4 = 162 – 101 = 61

Chapters 5, 6 = 245* – 163 = 82

*  The trick here is to not include the last item #246, that is after 5 stars and is a conclusion.

Multiply by 100 – 60 – 30 and then reverse

100 x 83 = 8,300

60 x 61 = 3660

30 x 82 = 2,460

Sum of products = 14,420, factor of 70

30 x 83 = 2,490

60 x 61 = 3,660

100 x 82 = 8,200

Sum of products = 14,350, factor of 70

Adding sums of products

14,420 + 14,350 = 28,770, factors 70 and 411

Where is the 70 x 7?

Breaking apart the 4-1-1, I get

100 x 4 = 400

60 x 1 = 60

30 x 1 = 30

Sum of products = 490 or 70 x 7

Reverse is:

30 x 4 = 120

60 x 1 = 60

100 x 1 = 100

Sum of products = 280 (factor of 70)

Sum of sum of products = 490 + 280 = 770 or seven hundred seventy

What happens if I take the difference of the sums of products above?

14,420 minus 14,350 = 70

I like this puzzle of the Pope’s and the ingenuity of it, but I would rather have something more traditional.  That was solution 24.

I feel fairly confident that I am working the numbers correctly having eventually gotten “70 x 7” results using the same basic method (chapter-items) on two of Francis’ books.   I don’t mean I am absolutely sure, as I can’t be sure there are even any embedded sevens at all in Vatican documents.

 

Solution 5: another try at Francis’ Laudato Si

Can there be more than one solution to a Sower’s Sevens puzzle?  Yes, in fact the more sophisticated a puzzle is, the more solutions, even within the same number set.

I went back to Francis’ Laudato Si to see what else I could do with it.

Each of six chapters has Roman numeral headings within it.  Determine the total number of Roman numerals per chapter.  Arrange these values in their order in the text in three subsets:

Chapters 1 and 2 = 14 Roman numerals

Chapters 3 and 4 = 7 Roman numerals

Chapters 5 and 6 = 14 Roman numerals

Sum = 35

This arrangement is very unusual as all 3 values (14, 7, 14) are divisible by 7.  Also the first and third subsets are equal.

Just look at all those 7 factors!

Multiplying by 100 – 60 – 30

100 x 14 = 1,400

60 x 7 = 420

30 x 14 = 420

Sum of products = 2,240

As expected, a factor of 70

Reverse

30 x 14 = 420

60 x 7 = 420

100 x 14 = 1,400

Sum of products = 2,240, factor of 70

As expected, identical to the previous sum of products.

I’ve never seen anything quite like this.  Can it be biblical?

If I take the difference between the sums of products I get zero.  Sort of what you might expect for an environmental encyclical on the end of the world.

If I add the sums of products do I get a “70 x 7”?  No.

Adding the sums of products

2,240 + 2,240 = 4,480, factors of 2^7 and 35

Recall that there are 35 Roman numerals in this puzzle.  So 35 appears again – a nice touch.  If we sum the values in the 3 subsets for both sums of products we get 70 (14 + 7 + 14 + 14 + 7 + 14).

What about the 2^7?  That means 2 to the 7th power.  Are 7 of 2 just as sacred as 2 of 7?  Since I have encountered this 2^7 as a solution for biblical puzzles before, I’ll say yes.

Presumably, the Pope (or his editor) is putting in the sevens-squared or the 2’s raised to the 7th power for an audience.  Who is in this audience I don’t know.  I doubt very much I am in the intended audience, but nevertheless I appreciate and applaud.  A lovely puzzle and I’m glad I spent the time to find it and type it up.  Of course, just because I am finding puzzles and solutions doesn’t necessarily prove there actually are such embedded.

 

Where to find 70 x 7 and 30-60-100 in the Bible:

Seven is a favored number in the Bible. The biblical “70 x 7” is found printed (not hidden) in Matthew 18:22 (footnote NRSV) and also in Genesis 4:24.  By the way, I believe that means seventy times sevenfold (DRA), not 77 times.

The Sower’s Parables numbers can be found at: (1) Matthew 13:8 (100, 60, 30); (2) Matthew 13:23 (100, 60, 30); (3) Mark 4:8 (30, 60, 100); (4) Mark 4:20 (30, 60, 100); and (5) Luke 8:8 (100).

link to Pope Francis’ Amoris Laetitia

http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/apost_exhortations/documents/papa-francesco_esortazione-ap_20160319_amoris-laetitia.html

link to Pope Benedict’s Vatican Compendium in English

http://www.vatican.va/archive/compendium_ccc/documents/archive_2005_compendium-ccc_en.html

link to wiki Kensington Rune Stone

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kensington_Runestone

link to Francis’ Laudato Si

http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html

 

Update June 21, 2016

SOWER’S SEVENS IN FRANCIS’ LAUDATO SI AND AMORIS LÆTITIA

After taking a detour into the Temple of Solomon (side-bar) where I was finally able to break the Temple codes in 1Kings and 2Chronicles, I decided to make another try at Pope Francis’ Laudato Si and Amoris Laetitia.

Amazingly, both these documents issued by Pope Francis employ a type of algorithm also present in the Temple of Solomon in 2Chronicles, that is, assembling a number set by making a string of alternating even and odd numbers.  Both of Francis’ documents share a sum of products (5,880) also present in 1Kings 7:23 (Solution 4 in Temple of Solomon side-bar).

However, Pope Francis’ documents have the numbers embedded in the formatting of the text, not in the text itself, as far as I know.

So with basically the same algorithm being used in both of Pope Francis documents and finding the same sum of products, I am well prepared to be convinced that I am onto something.

Does the Pope have time to play with numbers?  I will make a guess that an editor was assigned the task of making sure that whatever the Pope issues has been properly filled with sacred numbers.  To what purpose?  I don’t know.  Maybe just to honor the biblical heritage of the organization and especially to remember the Temple of Solomon, apparently built to specifications that involved hidden sevens.

What does the Pope and his editor call these hidden sevens that I call “Sower’s Sevens”?  I don’t know.  I don’t think they are going to tell me what they know.  I sure hope they have an app to help them embedding the sevens.

 

Solution 6: Another try at Pope Francis LAUDATO SI’ (On Care For Our Common Home) May 24, 2015

The number set of 30 values is derived from the numbering of the items in chapters and introduction.  To produce each value take the difference between the item number for the last item and the first in that section.  Then create a string of 30 values by first taking an odd, then an even number.  (This is the reverse of 2Chronicles which is first even, then odd.)  Then put the 30 values in ascending order of 3 subsets of 10 values each.

The trick is to count the zero differences as next even numbers (if applicable) but not add them into a subset as they have no value.  Is that kosher?  Maybe yes if I get a good answer.

Step by step:

Here are the item differences with the 30 resultant odd and even numbers bolded and underlined:

INTRO

2-1=1  heading ‘nothing’ 6-3=3  heading ‘united’ 9-7=2  heading ‘saint’ 12-10=2  heading ‘my’ 16-13=3

CHAPTER ONE

19-17=2  ROMAN NUMERAL I  heading ‘pollution’ 22-20=2 heading ‘climate’  26-23=3  ROMAN NUMERAL II  31-27=4  ROMAN NUMERAL III  42-32=10  ROMAN NUMERAL IV  47-43=4  ROMAN NUMERAL V  52-48=4  ROMAN NUMERAL VI  59-53=6  ROMAN NUMERAL VII  61-60=1

CHAPTER TWO

62=0 [even but no value]  ROMAN NUMERAL I  64-63= 1  ROMAN NUMERAL II  75-65=10  ROMAN NUMERAL III  83-76=7  ROMAN NUMERAL IV  88-84=4  ROMAN NUMERAL V  92-89=3  ROMAN NUMERAL VI  95-93=2  ROMAN NUMERAL VII  100-96=4

CHAPTER THREE

101=0  ROMAN NUMERAL I  105-102=3  ROMAN NUMERAL II  114-106=8  ROMAN NUMERAL III  121-115=6  heading ‘practical’  123-122=1  heading ‘the need’  129-124=5  heading ‘new’  136-130=6

CHAPTER FOUR

137=0  ROMAN NUMERAL I  142-138=4  ROMAN NUMERAL II  146-143=3  ROMAN NUMERAL III  155-147=8  ROMAN NUMERAL IV  158-156=2  ROMAN NUMERAL V  162-159=3

CHAPTER FIVE

163=0 [even but no value]  ROMAN NUMERAL I  175-164=11  ROMAN NUMERAL II  181-176=5  ROMAN NUMERAL III  188-182=6  ROMAN NUMERAL IV  198-189=9  ROMAN NUMERAL V  201-199=2

CHAPTER SIX

202=0  ROMAN NUMERAL I  208-203=5  ROMAN NUMERAL II  215-209=6  ROMAN NUMERAL III  221-216=5  ROMAN NUMERAL IV 227-222=5  ROMAN NUMERAL V  232-228=4  ROMAN NUMERAL VI  237-233=4  ROMAN NUMERAL VII  240-238=2  ROMAN NUMERAL VIII  242-241=1  ROMAN NUMERAL IX  245-243=2

ENDING

246=0

Put into ascending order and into 3 subsets of 10 values each and sum:

1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2

Sum = 15

3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5

Sum = 35

5, 6, 6, 6, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 11

Sum = 76

Next multiply by Sower’s parables numbers 100-60-30:

100 x 15 = 1,500

60 x 35 = 2,100

30 x 76 = 2,280

Sum of products = 5,880, factors of 70 x 7 x 12

Thus a biblical 70 x 7 is achieved along with a factor of 12, a special number in the Bible.

 

Solution 7:  Pope Francis’ AMORIS LÆTITIA (On Love in the Family) March 19, 2016

The number set of 3 values is derived from the numbering of the items in chapters and introduction.  To produce each value take the difference between the item number for the last item and the first in that section.  Then create a string of 3 values by first taking an even, then an odd number.

Chapter and introduction item values are arranged as follows, beginning with the intro, then chapter 1 and so on.  The first even value is bolded and underlined.  Likewise the first odd value, and the next even value.

Introduction, 1 through 7, difference is 6

Chapter 1, 8 through 30, difference is 22

Chapter 2, 31 through 57, difference is 26

Chapter 3, 58 through 88, difference is 30

Chapter 4, 89 through 164, difference is 75

Chapter 5, 165 through 198, difference is 33

Chapter 6, 199 through 258, difference is 59

Chapter 7, 259 through 290, difference is 31

Chapter 8, 291 through 312, difference is 21

Chapter 9, 313 through 325, difference is 12

Next I use the Sower’s numbers (30-60-100) and multiply:

30 x 6 = 180

60 x 75 = 4,500

100 x 12 = 1,200

Sum of products = 5,880, factors of 70 x 7 x 12

Thus a biblical 70 x 7 is achieved along with a factor of 12, a special number in the Bible.

This is the same sum of products (5, 880) as for Solution 6 above and also in Solution 4 in the Temple of Solomon (side-bar).

This is a wonderful way for the Pope to honor biblical traditions by mimicking the algorithms in 2Chronicles and 1Kings regarding the Temple of Solomon !!!

The Temple of Solomon is an example of ecumenism as Solomon called on a neighboring ruler to help him in constructing the Temple.  So very refreshing that the Pope is reflecting on the Temple of Solomon.  Or the Pope’s editor is doing this reflecting.

 

What are the odds?

I now have 29 examples of Sower’s Sevens in various religious texts.  What are the odds of getting a “70 x 7” as a factor?  The odds are 1 in 490, but since I add a factor of 10 in the process of doing the arithmetic, the odds are 1 in 49.  What are the odds of getting a “70 x 7” in 29 examples?  The odds are 1 in 7^29 (one in seven to the 29th power) – astronomical.

 

Updated June 21, 2016

 

Posted June 11, 2016

 

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